A Review Of ‘An Eschatological Bestiary’ By Oz Hardwick

As ever on Ijo Pona, I only review things that I like; things that have inspired me, things that have moved me and things that just plain tickle me. An Eschatological Bestiary by Oz Hardwick is such a book.

Billed as “…… [Eschatological Bestiary] offers symbolic visions, modern protest, and a complete exegetical interpretation of the dramatic rise of an apparently semi-permanent moral blank.” And, I can’t put the damn thing down.

What about Oz? Who is he? Well, I am pleased to call him ‘Friend.’ Oz Hardwick occupies numerous media, having been instrumental in various well-received local and international ‘open spaces’. He is spooked by international markets and more recent turns undermining democracy. As befits the passionately English, he thrives on poetry and music magazines. Prof. Hardwick is a frequent reviewer of his own work, benefiting a minority in Leeds Trinity University College and a larger writing culture beyond since 2000.

In addition to glacial analyses, therefore, this ‘sea text dream collection’ preserves a record (including tents) of data relating to prophetic processes in any town’s financial district, revealing the value of bad practice. – www.doghornpublishing.com

I admit that it has been a long time since I have put pen to paper – other than Blogging. However, this book conveys the grace of the author. You are not purchasing a tome – you are purchasing a Mind Transmission direct from one of the most caring, deeply sensitive individuals that I have had the good fortune to meet. I would post this review on Amazon – but having a personal tie with the author would lead to claims of being biased – I would much rather lay my cards on the table, here, safely within the confines of www.ijopona.org

Q: “Well, what is this book about?”

A: “Haven’t a clue – but, I love it!”

My personal interpretation of the book is that it comes as if it is a recollection of a dream. The text sometime conveys as something I would receive as Spam on my Blog here – but, Oz guides the text out of himself on to the permanent page with finesse and aplomb.

Now then – I do not have permission to post this up here, but it is made available to read on Amazon – here is the link to Eschatological Bestiary by Oz Hardwick – so I will type up one of the excerpts from the book that is in the public domain –

Viper

Viper pours out her poison but grieves for men at the very moment they take their sad deaths. This principle is doubtless a natural power, impossible to put into flimsy tradition; the only distinct allusion to the transaction being unclassified but perfectly recorded. Viper may appear harsh or drunken  because she is asking natural questions, yet she actually embraces for a long, slimy sermon. Once she speaks unaided, Viper cannot be brought to obedience entirely through divine arrangement, although less pure difficulty does not exclude the possibility of such effect. The young in their ecstasy are ready to be referred to the blind man in order to take possession of a external enticement, such as garlic, so if Viper resembles children, be suspect, and put eggs inside old wax. Viper loves heat and say ill-humour when she is aware you are not her master and takes flight. Whilst Viper is already to say stop, she is equally prone to seduce medicine and urge you to cease deceitful, uncouth intercourse by mother’s side. Viper conceives by taking the males head in her mouth. She then bites off his head and he dies. If Viper is invited, kill her.

This is just one of the passages in the book – the book composes of a different animal on each page propped up by Oz’s excellent collages. I would try and scan a collage in to this Blog post but I reckon I may be pushing it already by penning the entry for Viper, above.

From ‘Ape’ to ‘Zebra’, Oz Hardwick presents what appears to be, at first glance, a traditional medieval bestiary – not that I am over familiar with that genre.  The mixture of natural history, superstition, biblical allegory that I expect exists in such a work is here. However, as a Medieval Bestiary tried to make sense of the Natural World, Eschatological Bestiary revels in fragmentation. I have read on another review –

Rather than cohesive, this hymn to the apocalypse is full of holes. – Steve Nash

This playful adventure of a book is a nod to new beginnings as the mushroom cloud bellows. It is my favourite book.

 
A Harrogate Blog - Written By A Harrogate Blogger. Andy Is Harrogate's Chief Procrastinator. A 'Funny Little Man.' By day a web designer, Andy has a hand in several music projects - including being in a chart-topping producer duo and he runs his own record label.